Archive for the ‘WordPress’ Category

Page Speed and WordPress Blogs

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

As I’ve been attending presentations, workshops and conferences over the past months, there has been more and more emphasis (segments) on Page Load Time – the speed with which a page displays. (Since 2010, speed has been one of the factors that contributes to a web page’s rank in the search engine results pages.)

Google’s Steve Vinter  spoke about page speed in a March presentation to the Marlborough business community. Jonathan Hochman gave an entire presentation on page/website speed for SEMNE in June, and there were two or three sessions that I attended this weekend at WordCamp Boston that mentioned the importance of page load time. Indeed, I attended the presentation Optimizing WordPress for Speed and Scale given by Ben Metcalfe which was loaded with tips on how to decrease page load time.

I mention all of this to let you know that I have taken ONE baby step. I installed a highly recommended WordPress plugin called W3 Total Cache to my websites today. Prior to doing that I used pingdom tools to get a benchmark of the current speed.

I will wait some time and re-measure and keep you posted as to the results.

Have you been using W3 Total Cache? What kinds of results have you experienced?

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

WordPress Rules Top 100 Blogs

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Pingdom recently posted the results of a study they had just completed regarding the top 100 blogs on the Internet (WordPress completely dominates  top 100 blogs). They chose the top 100 blogs from the  Technorati Top 100.

We just completed a study and found that WordPress is in use by 48% of the top 100 blogs in the world. This is an increase from the 32% we recorded three years ago.

A 50% increase in just three years!  This is great news for a blog developer like myself. Now that this information is public, I expect an even greater increase during the next three years. Why? Because it is very common practice that people who want to achieve a higher level, look at those who are succeeding, and model themselves after them. They go where they go. They eat what they eat. They blog as frequently as they blog…Now they know that 48% of the succcessful are using WordPress as a blogging platform, and they’ll choose WordPress as their blogging plaform.

Other developments since then include that custom blog publishing platforms are more common now, TypePad has all but disappeared from the top 100, Tumblr has made an entrance, and some companies really don’t want to spill the beans about what solutions they use.

It is really interesting to me that businesses are using custom blog publishing software… hummmm…wave of the future.

To see a list of the other blog platforms and the list of the top 100 blogs Pingdom researched , follow the link on the article listed in the first sentence.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

WordPress Editorial Calendar Widget

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

One of my goals this year was to be more faithful and consistent with writing in my blog. An extension of that goal was to get my clients re-energized and re-focused about writing in their blogs. I was intermittently successful with each of those…I am still seeking consistency in blogging frequency. Which brings us to today’s topic.

I follow Daniel Scocco of dailyblogtips.com who sends out Daily Blog Tips (of course!). Recently, a guest post by Annabel Candy about the WordPress Editorial Calendar widget was posted in his blog.  Ms. Candy wrote about the 5 reasons bloggers will love the WordPress Editorial Calendar:

  1. It makes planning blog posts easy
  2. You can see your whole editorial calendar on one screen
  3. It’s easy to reschedule blog posts
  4. It helps you structure your blog content
  5. It allows you to be more creative

The WordPress Editorial Calendar widget is a tool that helps bloggers get organized with their blogging efforts. The WordPress Editorial Calendar is primarily a scheduling tool. It lets you look at all your posts in Calendar format (rather than the straight text lists that we see in the WordPress Dashboard 20, 40, 60 at a time) in order to see when they have been/will be published. You can drag and drop blog posts from one date&time to another.

For visual bloggers, I think this is an excellent tool. For bloggers who are also planners this is an excellent tool.

How can you be successful with the WordPress Editorial Calendar widget if you are a blogger who struggles to stay true to your blogging frequency goals?

Well, this tool forces us to be disciplined. It is a scheduler, not a blog post writer, so, we will still own the responsibility to come up with the topics and write the blog posts – but – once we get those pieces defined, we can data enter the posts, and then we will be able to see at a glance the “content” we are offering. Seeing that, we will be able to evaluate our work – Are we blogging about the topics that are of interest to our target audience? Are we taking the target audience on the trip that we intended? Are the topics in an order that will help our audience quickly and easily understand – or – is it going to be a bumpy ride?

WordPress Editorial Calendar Screenshot

WordPress Editorial Calendar Screenshot taken from http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/editorial-calendar/screenshots/

Seeing the posts and the flow of topics will help each of us fine-tune our blogging goals and answer lots more marketing questions as we move through the year.

Read the article by Ms. Candy: 5 Reasons You’ll Love the WordPress Editorial Calendar

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

How Frequently Should You Upgrade WordPress?

Monday, September 26th, 2011

WordPress is a package of programs and files (software) with built-in functionality that makes it easy for users to focus on writing in their blogs, and leaves the heavy-lifting (archiving, re-categorizing blog posts by date, category, sub category, and tag,  adding content to the search capability, etc) to WordPress.

As a “software” package, WordPress needs to be upgraded just like your desktop “software” packages like Quicken®, Microsoft Word®, and  Adobe Photoshop®.  Every quarter or two a new version of WordPress is released. And versions are released within a much shorter time span when they are security releases.

If your website is built on a WordPress platform or your blog is on a WordPress platform, you should be periodically upgrading the WordPress software package. (Updating your website, blog or content is separate from  upgrading the WordPress software package. Your website, blog or content sits on WordPress and is managed by the WordPress software package.)

The recommendations that I make to my WordPress clients is:

  • Upgrade WordPress once per year at a minimum. Upgrading once per year, keeps costs to a minimum and ensures that your version of WordPress is not so far away from the current “supported” version.
  • Regardless of when you upgraded your WordPress software package last, upgrade it immediately if there is a security release.
  • Do not upgrade your WordPress software the moment a new version is released.  Wait a couple of months to 6 months, then read the feedback in the forums to see how smoothly the upgrade went for those who have aleready upgraded. Use their feedback to prepare you for your upgrade. 

TIP: The further away your version gets from the current supported release: the harder it is to upgrade, the more time-consuming it is to upgrade, the more expensive it is to upgrade. To check for the latest release, go to WordPress.org and read the Download Button.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

WordPress Training Special

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

Get 1.5 hours of WordPress® Training for $99 during October and November!

WordPress Training Special

Over the phone, in-person, at the coffee shop.

You prepare a list of questions or order the Intro to WordPress session.

This offer is for bloggers who have WordPress blogs and want to learn more about updating their blogs.
Existing customers are welcome.

Must purchase and schedule by OCTOBER 31st. Training can be scheduled for October or November. Coupon can be used for up to three (1.5 hr.) sessions. All sessions prepaid at time of purchase/scheduling.

Blocked dates…Training not available October 17th – 21st nor November 23rd – 25th.

To reserve your date(s) for WordPress Training, contact Karen at 508-480-8833 or
use the Make Payment button (in the header) to purchase your sessions

1 ($99)   ~~~~~~  2 ($198)  ~~~~~~  3 ($297)
In the Invoices Paying field – Enter “WordPress Training”.

Karen will contact you to schedule your session(s) upon receiving notification of your payment.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •